Dracula, when the BBC tastes like blood

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A strange proposition that this miniseries on Dracula, first broadcast on the BBC, then on Netflix a few days later. Strange, indeed, but not devoid of charm, even if this television proposal of the segment of the same team which directed Sherlock, Trace Gatiss and Steven Moffat, segment alas a little in all directions. In a distant castle in Transylvania, Count Dracula receives an uncomplicated lawyer, Jonathan Harker, to help him formalize a real estate transaction in England. The account wants to move abroad, so various administrative work must be completed before proceeding. Of course, Dracula hides a sinister secret… Vampire enthusiasts who have read the classic Bram Stoker, or who have seen Nosferatu, the film by 1922, will be immediately on familiar ground. Rather than give in to the sirens of time-lapse entertainment that pollutes screens too often, nowadays, the creators of this miniseries have rather chosen the path of reflection and dialogue. Level of horror series, here, if not a few more or less frightening passages – which we can see in the almost deceptive trailer broadcast on Netflix -, but rather an almost slow rhythm, with long exchanges between the protagonists and the creation of a glaucous atmosphere at will. Of course, we introduce some adaptations here and there, like this sister by the name of Van Helsing, who comes to the aid of Mr. Harker, or even all these scriptwriting stages based on the concept of undead, but in the together, the original work is respected practically to the letter here. It all takes some time to adapt, but it is common that we can happily enjoy a series without worrying that it is that you just may perhaps per chance perhaps judge that it is unduly prolonged because of its unexpected popularity. Here, we are entitled to three episodes, no more. The first two sections of this miniseries are also little gems of scenario and stress practically solely due to the dialogues and the acting of the actors. We salute here the work of Claes Bang, the Danish actor who plays the most famous of vampires. Bold, relentless, but also funny, or terribly seductive at times, Bang plays a Dracula more than pleasant to listen to. We would practically take sides with him, in front of awkward and weak humans. The problem is that after a particularly unexpected turnaround at the end of the second episode, the third part of the miniseries drives the viewer to take an interest in new issues, new characters, and painfully recreate the ambiance and atmosphere that had been delicately sculpted for almost three hours beforehand. Without giving too many details, at the risk of spoiling the surprise, this in-depth transformation gives a little the impression that the writers, having “painted in a corner” after two episodes, tried to breathe new life into an adventure which could, let’s be honest, end in two events, rather than three. The exercise is no less interesting, if only to prove that there is a television market for classic works, and, above all, for intelligent works that take the time to do things right. Other content: Joker: Attack of the Clowns About the reporter Hugo PrévostCo-founder and editor of Pieuvre.ca, Hugo Prévost has been passionate about journalism since childhood. If he is mainly interested in politics, science, technology and culture, Hugo does not hesitate to dive head first into the challenges of society, the economy or even leisure and tourism . Hugo is also a member of the editorial team of Pieuvre.ca.
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