Review: “My home is not Copacabana” by Anna de Lima Fagerlind

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By playing a role in a Swedish movie, Toninho was lifted from the 1960 century out of poverty in Rio de Janeiro’s favelas and given a life he previously only dreamed of. But it happened at a price. In a completely poignant book, Anna de Lima Fagerlind portrays her father’s fate. Brazil has long served as a projection space for fantasies of the naturally sensual, a kind of paradise place where beauty is foundational and the sun always shines. The annual carnival in Rio appears as a kind of unbeatable hedonistic climax. Sweden’s relationship with Brazil is no exception. The country has for at least 200 years exerted a strong attraction on us, but the driving forces have shifted. Small turn of the century 1900 emigrated a few thousand Swedes. They fled poverty and were promised lucrative jobs in agriculture. For most people, the dream ended in misery and contemporary York poverty. Many died. About the same time as the military took control in the middle of the 1960 century, the cool, seductive tones of the new bossanova music style began to sweep across the world, including little Sweden. The Ipanema beach is forever burned into our minds by singer Astrud Gilberto’s collaboration with American jazz saxophonist Stan Getz.
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